Selected Articles: Earth Day 2017. Humans are the Most Destructive Species on Planet Earth

Global Research, April 22, 2017

Earth Day 2017: Humans Are The Most Destructive Species On Earth

By Pratap Antony, April 20, 2017

Our planet is not in danger. Humans are in danger. From ourselves. Humankind is on the road to extinguish ourselves. Sooner rather than later. The future for all of us is bleak. The planet will continue as it has for the 99% of the time before man, it will adjust and continue. Perhaps with other life forms, other vegetation, other landscapes.

Life on Earth is Dying. Thousands of Species Cease to Exist. Homo Sapiens is the Cause

By Robert J. Burrowes, April 20, 2017

You and I are on the brink of driving to extinction some of the most iconic species alive today. For a photo gallery of threatened species, some of which are ‘critically endangered’, see ‘World’s wildlife being pushed to the edge by humans – in pictures’.

Earth Day is no longer about Celebration: Uranium Contamination Across America, Holding the Silent Killers Of Environmental Destruction Accountable

By Kevin Zeese and Margaret Flowers, April 21, 2017

Earth Day is no longer about celebration. We are making Mother Earth sick by using extreme methods to extract fuels from her mountains and from beneath her surface and by massive spills of oil, chemicals and radiation. We must mobilize ourselves to take action now to create clean renewable energy and to restore the damage we have done.

From Earth Day to the Monsanto Tribunal, Capitalism on Trial by Colin Todhunter, April 22, 2017

Earth Day came a few days after the legal opinion offered by the five international judges who presided over the Monsanto Tribunal in The Hague. The judges concluded that Monsanto has engaged in practices that have impinged on the basic human right to a healthy environment, the right to food and the right to health. Monsanto’s conduct also has had a negative impact on the right of scientists to freely conduct indispensable research.

Self-Assured Destruction, The Climate Impacts of Nuclear War. Mass Starvation, Ozone Depletion by Alan Robock and Owen Brian Toon, April 22, 2017

Even a “small” nuclear war between India and Pakistan, with each country detonating 50 Hiroshima-size atom bombs—only about 0.03 percent of the global nuclear arsenal’s explosive power—as air bursts in urban areas, could produce so much smoke that temperatures would fall below those of the Little Ice Age of the fourteenth to nineteenth centuries, shortening the growing season around the world and threatening the global food supply.

Posted on April 22, 2017, in Uncategorized and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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